Trailer

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What big-name developers have said about Moleman 4

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Behind the scenes - Watch how we made Moleman 4

Watch the intro animation of Moleman 4

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Watch deleted scenes from the film

The man who introduced Tetris to the Western world.

Robert Stein fled from Hungary in 1956 and a few months later ended up in England. For a year and a half he was moving from one place to the next with his family before they could finally find a permanent residence. He was interested in computer science, especially the diverse world of chess computers. Soon he got employed as a salesman of these computers by the English company SciSys which was founded in 1978. When his good friend John Baxter became the marketing manager at the English Commodore company they decided to pay a visit to Rényi Gábor and ask him to establish the background for computer game development in Hungary and to create games for the recently launched Commodore 64 Home Computer. This is when the long-term collaboration between the Hungarian game development company Novotrade and Stein’s new English company the Andormeda Software began. It was also Robert Stein who first paid attention to a game developed in the USSR: the Tetris. The fact that today it’s known all over the world and it has become such a huge success is to a large extent due to his contribution.

How did Indiana Jones give birth to Lara Croft?

Ian Livingstone and Steve Jackson set up their business called Games Workshop in 1975. In the beginning they couldn’t afford renting an office so they dealt with the orders in their room. Shortly, their tenant got fed up, though, with the incessant flow of parcels and people looking for the Games Workshop store in the house, for everyone thought it was an actual shop. They got evicted. Next, they decided to rent an office rather than a flat for themselves and so together they moved into Jackson’s minivan to dwell. At the beginning of the 80s they co-created the Fighting Fantasy book series and later with the assistance of a Hungarian team Livingston embarked on developing his first computer game. Later, as executive chairman of Eidos in the 90s he was supervising the development of games like Tomb Raider and Hitman.

The Hungarian way of getting round the development deadline.

It’s still rather common today that the developers cannot properly finish the game for the tight deadline appointed by the publisher. Often, the necessary corrections and patches are added to the game even months later. In the 80s, however, a Hungarian development team managed to hand over their semi-finished product in a way that the publisher didn’t even notice. Ferenc Tilesch got into a difficult situation during the development of his first game, the White Viper, which could have easily jeopardized the whole project as such.

The abandoned Star Trek game.

Many regard Imperium Galactica II developed by Digital Reality the best Hungarian video game ever made. However, not many people know that later the same group was working on a Star Trek game as well.

Activision ordered the game back in 2003 but due to legal complications the project which, incidentally, looked quite phenomenal, had to be abandoned. While shooting Moleman 4 we saw a video about it showing the spaceship of many different species as well as the legendary Deep Space Nine space station. One specialty would’ve been an entirely new species that has never appeared in a feature film or a series before.

The Soviets vs. The Toy Gun

Hungary was still strongly haunted by the specter of the USSR when commercial game development began. During the 80s the Soviet delegation visited Budapest several times and sometimes they were invited to the computer game developing company Novotrade as well. The delegation was probably not interested at all in game development, still these visits were not without danger. There were times when the developers were quite literally putting their lives on the line while introducing video-games. In the next clip one of the survivors, Antal Zolnai, is talking about his experiences.

If you are interested in further outtakes please support our independent filmmaker team by buying the film.

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Listen to Moleman 4 Original Soundtrack

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